HST 367: Modern Britain                                                                            Spring, 2002
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:40-11:55 a.m.                                                      SS 335

PROFESSOR R. ADELSON

Office: Social Sciences Building, Room 230C
Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:00-2:00 p.m., and by appointment
Phone: 965-4594 (with voice mail) or leave message at History Dept., 965-5778
E-mail: adelsonr@asu.edu

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

This course surveys the British Isles and the British Empire from the late 1600s to the present by analyzing four distinct "periods" of British society:
1. Aristocratic Britain, from the 1680s to the 1780s, when society was dominated by the aristocracy; the population grew steadily, but still lived mainly in the countryside; great wealth was mostly derived from agriculture and overseas trade, both of which expanded enormously during the 1700s; religion, law, domestic and imperial politics were ruled by the crown and oligarchy; culture reflected the preferences of the gentry as well as some urban grandees; most people could be defined, according to the novelist Henry Fielding, as "nobody."
2. Industrial Britain, from the 1790s to the 1870s, when aristocratic domination was challenged by unprecedented industrial and urban developments; entrepeneurial values and new classes appeared amidst explosive population growth and shifts, with new industrial cities providing the impetus for religious, legal, political, and imperial reforms as the ruling oligarchy expanded and adapted itself to new opportunities from British wealth and world power; the gap between rich and poor widened in some areas and narrowed in others, as people identified more with their own kin and region than with the nation or empire.
3. Metropolitan Britain, from the 1880s to the 1940s, when plutocratic London dominated British finance, trade, empire, government, politics, trade unions, media, and service industries; living conditions in huge cities became much more crowded, despite lower birth rates, enormous emigration, and war casualties; with depressed agricultural and industrial sectors, finance and trade still flourished; political power remained in the hands of elites despite a universal franchise and a mass opinion that identified erratically with the empire; the gap between rich and poor widened, despite some experimention with welfare programs.
4. Contemporary Britain, since the 1940s, when the British Isles have been marked by suburban sprawl and new towns, with the populace more fragmented, racially less homogeneous, and reduced deference towards elders and "betters"; consumerism has driven a sluggish economy recovering from costly wars, waves of de-colonization, the mismanagement of business and industry, foreign take-overs and powerful unions; stable parliamentary government, a popular monarchy, private schools, and public patronage of the arts have persisted despite the omnipresent media, Americanization, and the greater visibility of youth and popular culture.

REQUIRED READINGS

1. The Past Speaks, Sources and Problems in British History, Vol. II: Since 1688, edited by Walter L. Arnstein, 2nd edition (Lexington, Mass : D.C. Heath and Co., 1993), with many used copies available at the campus and local books stores. Arnsteinís excellent anthology provides students with hands-on experience working with the kinds of materials historians use to understand the past.
2. William B. Willcox and Walter L. Arnstein, The Age of Aristocracy, 1688 to 1830, 7th edition (Lexington, Mass.: D.C. Heath and Co., 1996), with some earlier, used editions acceptable, but not recommended.
3. Walter L. Arnstein, Britain Yesterday and Today, 1830 to the Present, 7th edition (Lexington, Mass.: D.C. Heath and Co., 1996), with some earlier, used editions acceptable, but not recommended.
 
 

LECTURES AND SLIDE PRESENTATIONS ON TUESDAYS

Professor Adelson assumes that students have read the pages in the texts that were assigned for that day on the class schedule. His lectures, abailable in outline form on his course website, provide information and interpretations that cannot be found in Arnsteinís texts, so students should take notes in class. Professor Adelson prefers not to be interrupted while lecturing on Tuesdays so he can get through the material to allow sufficient time at the end of his lecture for slides and other illustrative sources. He makes use of visual and aural material in order to suggest some of the regional variations, cultural styles, and class differences that are typical of Modern Britain and the British Empire. TAPE RECORDERS MAY BE USED BY DISABLED STUDENTS OR WITH PROFESSOR ADELSONíS PERMISSION.

DISCUSSIONS, QUIZZES, EXAMS AND IN-CLASS EXERCISES ON THURSDAYS

Student participation will be emphasized so as to break down some of the barriers that can exist in large history courses that are dominated by lectures. After students are invited to ask questions about the previous class, Professor Adelson will conduct Thursdayís discussion based entirely on the material assigned from the Arnstein anthology for that day. This material students must read very carefully, with a dictionary at hand, in order to make sure they understand the source. (In order to make sure that students come to class prepared to discuss the readings from the Arnstein anthology that are assigned for that day, there will be several unannounced 10-minute quizzes over the pages assigned for Thursdays, based on the questions posed by Arnstein in the introductions to each chapter.) NO NOTES MAY BE USED WHILE TAKING EXAMS OR QUIZZES
I
n the last weeks of the course, there will be four in-class exercises involving student role-playing and their identification with an individual Briton of the Twentieth Century. Every student will take a part in one of the following: an Edwardian "soap", a mock House of Commons debate on Irish Home Rule in 1912,  editorial meetings of left-wing and right-wing partisan weeklies in the 1930s; a review of British popular music since the Beatles, or an appraisal of the contemporary London press. Students will be given their first choices when possible. Those who choose not to participate in the role-playing must do two one-page type-written assessments of two of the class presentations. Tuesday, April 30th, is the deadline for turning in the written assessments of two of the five class presentations.

GRADES FOR UNDERGRADUATES

Professsor Adelson does not grade on a curve and is willing to give high marks to those students who do quality work: 90-100=A; 80-89=B; 70-79=C; 60-69=D; below 60=E. The average of the three mid-terms and final examination will comprise two-thirds of the grade. The final is not cumulative.

There will be no make-up examinations. If Professor Adelson excuses a student from taking an exam (before 9:00 a.m., the day of the exam), the scores for the other three exams will be averaged without the missed exam. If not so excused, students who miss that examination will have their lowest exam score doubled and then averaged with the other exams. Obviously, if a student has done well enough on the three mid-terms, s/he may exercise the option of not taking the final.

The last third of the grade is based on class participation, i.e., the quizzes over the Arnstein anthology (there are no make-ups for quizzes, but one missed or the lowest quiz score will be dropped in determining the quiz average); the performance in one of the in-class exercises, with all members of the group receiving the same score, or the one-page assessment of a class presentation;  regular attendance is expected (records will be kept, with only two absences excused automatically during the entire semester).

GRADES FOR HONORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS

Students taking the class for graduate credit must enroll as HIS 590 or 790, Reading and Conference course in Modern Britain. While doing all the reading assigned to undergraduates, graduate students will prepare the mid-terms and final as take-home examinations, which must be comprehensive in content and polished in form (typewritten, double-spaced, with 1-inch margins, no typographical errors).
Honors students must critique two books and graduate students four books selected from the Arnstein bibliographies, The Age of Aristocracy, pp. 333-349, and/or Britain Yesterday and Today, pp. 472-501, their papers using the following format:
1. Full bibliographical entry--authorís full name; full title of book (underlined or italicized); place of publication, publisher, date of publication (in parentheses); nature and extent of bibliography; number of pages, illustrations, etc.
2. A brief paragraph about the authorís background, education, professional standing, and other publications.
3. A short summary of the book (not to exceed one page-long paragraph), which outlines the scholarly treatment of the subject.
4. The main part of the critique consists of evaluating the book: its strengths and weaknesses, such as documentation, interpretation, and style of presentation. It is suggested that three or four points be selected and each one be developed with a half-page-long paragraph. Specific parts of the book that seem relevant should be cited, giving the page number in parentheses afterwards, but not simply quoting long passages from the book. Each critique is to be 3 to 4 pages in length.
The first critique is due on Thursday, March 7th; the other critique(s) due on Tuesday, April 30th, with late papers penalized 10 points for every dayís tardiness. Critiques will comprise 1/6 of the grade, with the other 1/6 based on quiz scores and participation in in-class exercies or the two written assessments of same; the remaining 2/3 of the grade is based on the mid-term and final examination average.
Graduate students are expected to supplement the Arnstein texts and Adelson lectures by familiarizing themselves with The Cambridge Social History of Britain, 1750-1950, edited by F.M.L. Thompson, Volume I: Regions and Communities; Volume II: People and their Environment; Volume III: Social Agencies and Institutions; (Cambridge: The University Press, 1990); The Oxford History of the British Empire, edited by Wm. Roger Louis, Vol.I: The Origins of Empire; Vol. II: The Eighteenth Century; Vol. III: The Ninteenth Century; Vol. IV: The Twentieth Century; Vol. V: Historiography (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998-1999).

CLASS SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS
 
Tues., Jan. 15: Read Arnstein, Aristocracy, Chapters 1, 2, & 3 
Lecture: The "Glorious Revolution" and Aristocratic Britain
Thurs., Jan. 17: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapters 2 & 3 
Discussion (Quiz?)
Tues., Jan. 22: Read Arnstein, Aristocracy, Chapters 4, 5, & 6 
Lecture: Aristocratic Britain
Thurs., Jan. 24: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapters 4 & 5 
Discussion (Quiz?)
Tues., Jan. 29: Read Arnstein, Aristocracy, Chapters 7, 8, & 9 
Lecture: Aristocratic Britain
Thurs., Jan. 31: First examination (closed book; paper will be provided)

(40%) In three sentences, students should be able to identify and give the historical significance of each of the following (students may refer to Arnstein texts, the Encylcopedia Britannica and the Dictionary of National Biography, both of which are available in the Hayden Reference Department): 

Gregory King 
Bank of England 
Daniel Defoe 
Duke of Marlborough 
Act of Union with Scotland 
Sir Robert Walpole 
Lord Chatham, the Elder Pitt 
Seven Yearsí War 
Lord Clive 
Samuel Johnson 
Lord North 
William Hogarth 
Henry Fielding 
Adam Smith 
John Wesley 

(60%) In an essay of at least three pages, students should describe the main demographic, socio-economic, political, and cultural characteristics of Aristocratic Britain from the 1680s to the 1780s.

Tues., Feb. 5: Read Arnstein, Aristocracy, Chapters 10, 11, & 12 
Lecture: Industrial Britain
Thurs., Feb. 7: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapter 6 and 7 
Discussion (Quiz?)
Fri., Feb. 8: Unrestricted withdrawl deadline
Tues., Feb. 12: Read Arnstein, Yesterday, Chapters 1, 2, 3, & 4 
Lecture: Industrial Britain
Thurs., Feb. 14: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapters 8 & 9 
Discussion (Quiz?)
Tues., Feb 19: Read Arnstein, Yesterday, Chapters 5, 6, & 7 
Lecture: Industrial Britain
Thurs., Feb. 21: Second examination (closed book, paper will be provided) 

(40%) In three sentences, students should be able to identify and give the historical significance of each of the following: 

Tom Paine 
William Pitt, the Younger 
Act of Union with Ireland 
Lord Horatio Nelson 
Duke of Wellington 
Sir Robert Peel 
Viscount Palmerston 
Chartism 
Anti-Corn Law League 
The Oxford Movement 
The Great Exhibition 
Charles Darwin 
Charles Dickens 
Benjamin Disraeli 
William Gladstone 

(60%) In an essay of approximately three pages, students should describe the main demographic, socio-economic, political, and cultural characteristics of Industrial Britain from the 1790s to the 1870s.

Tues., Feb. 26: Read Arnstein, Yesterday, Chapters 8 & 9 
Lecture: Metropolitan Britain
 Thurs., Feb. 28: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapters 10 
Discussion (Quiz?)
Tues., March 5: Read Arnstein, Yesterday, Chapters 10 & 11;
Lecture: Metropolitan Britain
Thurs., March 7: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapter 11
Honors and Graduate Students turn in first critique
March 10-17:  Spring Recess at ASU
Tues., March 19: Read Arnstein, Yesterday, Chapters 12 & 13 
Lecture: Metropolitan Britain
Thurs., March 21: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapter 12 
Discussion (Quiz); Edwardian Soap
Tues., March 26:  Read Arnstein, Yesterday, Chapter 14 & 15 
Lecture: Metropolitan Britain
Thurs., March 28: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapters 13 & 14 
Discussion (Quiz?); House of Commons Debate on Ireland
Fri., March 29: Restricted course withdrawal deadline
Tues., April 2: Read Arnstein, Yesterday, Chapters 16 & 17 
Lecture: Metropolitan Britain
Thurs., April 4: Third examination (closed book, paper will be provided)

(40%) In three sentences, students should be able to identify and give the historical significance of each of the following: 

Boer War 
Rudyard Kipling 
Charles Booth 
Fabian Society 
Irish Home Rule 
Suffragists 
Arthur James Balfour 
Lord Northcliffe 
David Lloyd George 
H.G. Wells 
The Great War, 1914-1918 
Ramsay Macdonald 
Stanley Baldwin 
W.H. Auden 
Neville Chamberlain 

(60%) In approximately three pages, students should write an essay describing the demographic, socio-economic, political, and cultural characteristics of Metropolitan Britain from the 1880s to the 1940s.

Tues., Apr. 9: Read Arnstein, Yesterday, Chapters 18, 19, & 20 
Lecture: Contemporary Britain
Thurs., Apr. 11: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapter 15 & 16 
Discussion (Quiz?); Partisan Weeklies
Tues., Apr. 16: Read Arnstein, Yesterday, Chapters 21 & 22 
Lecture: Contemporary Britain
Thurs., April 18: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapters 18 & 19
Discussion (Quiz?); British Pop Music since the Beatles
Restricted complete withdrawal deadline
Tues., April 23: Read Arnstein, Yesterday, Chapter 22
Lecture: Contemporary Britain
Thurs., April 25: Read Arnstein, Past Speaks, Chapter 19
Discussion (Quiz?); The Contemporary London Press
 
Tues., April 30: No reading assignment
Lecture: Putting British History into a Global Perspective
Honors and graduate students turn in last critiques
Written assessments of a class presentation due
Fri., May 3: Final Examination (non-cumulative): 10:00-11:50 a.m.

(40%) In three sentences, students should be able to identify and give the historical significance of each of the following: 

Winston Churchill 
World War II, 1939-1945 
Beveridge Report 
National Health 
Decolonization 
George Orwell 
Bertrand Russell 
J.B. Priestly 
British Broadcasting Company 
Harold Macmillan 
Henry Moore 
The Beatles 
European Common Market 
Margaret Thatcher
Tony Blair

(60%) In approximately three pages, write an essay that describes the demographic, socio-economic, political, and cultural characteristics of Contempoary Britain from the 1940s to the present.

LECTURE OUTLINES

 Background Lecture
 Aristocratic Britain, from the 1680s to the 1780s
 Industrial Britain, from the 1790s to the 1870s
 Metropolitan Britain, from the 1880s to the 1940s
 Contemporary Britain, since the 1940s
In-class Role Playing Exercises