ART EDUCATION IN CULTURAL CONTEXTS

 

The 2004 International Society for Education through Art Conference in Istanbul and Cappadocia Turkey

Dr. Mary Stokrocki,

Professor of Art Education Office:

Art Building 252 Time: Thursdays, 4:30-7:30

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

TEXTS

COURSE GOALS

METHOD OF COMPARATIVE ANALSIS

POLISH GREEN SCHOOL

QUALITATIVE INTERVIEWING [Outside link]

QUALITATIVE FORMS OF ART EDUCATION RESEARCH [Outside link]

POSSIBLE SITES

EXAMPLE STUDIES BELOW:

Through Navajo Eyes

Children’s Ethnoaesthetic Responses to a Turkish Carpet: A Cross-cultural Study in Three Cultures…Turkey, Japan, and the Navajo Reservation

Art Criticism in Turkey:
Prospects and Problems of Exploring a Tapestry

Ak-Chin Ecomuseum in Arizona

 

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Relationship of multicultural perspectives to teaching and learning art criticism, aesthetics, studio art, and art history; in the local and global contexts.

Global education should not be viewed as a discipline with particular content or subject matter, rather it should be seen as an approach to the study of culture that can focus on international concerns or those related to study of students’ own local communities (Zimmerman, 1990).

The goal of experiential education is an increase of understanding (Deborah Smith-Shank). Sometimes misunderstandings are unfortunate, but as Lotman (2000) explains, not only understanding but also misunderstanding is a necessary and useful condition in communication. A text that is absolutely comprehensible is at the same time a text that is absolutely useless. An absolutely understandable and understanding partner would be convenient but unnecessary, since he or she would be a mechanical copy of my and our converse would provide us with no increase in information: just as there is not increase in money if one passes a purse from one pocket to another. A dialogue situation does not blur the distinctions between the partners, but intensifies them and makes them more significant (Lotman, 2000, p. 80).

 

TEXTS:

Stokrocki, M. (Ed.). (2009/2005). Interdisciplinary Art Education: Building Bridges to Connect Disciplines and Cultures. Reston, VA: National Art Education Association.

A. Arnold, A. Kuo, E. Delacruz, and M. Parsons (Eds.). (2009). G.L.O.B.A.L.I.Z.A.T.I.O.N, Art, and Education. Reston, VA: NAEA.

Irwin, R. & Kindler, A. (eds.). (1999). Beyond the school: Community and institutional partnerships in art education. Reston, VA; NAEA. ISBN#: 1-890160-09-1

SEE THE ARIAD RESEARCH DATA BASE: http://www.ariad.co.UK [UNITED KINGDOM ] Also see Australia’s (au) version at bottom of page.

Stokrocki, M. (2004) Contexts for Teaching Art. In E.. Eisner & M. Day (Eds.).Teaching and Teacher Education Handbook on Research and Policy in Art Education (pp. 439-466). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

 

COURSE GOALS & OBJECTIVES

The course will introduce students to the international realm of art education and local subcultures. By studying an unfamiliar culture, students learn a great deal about our own biases and related issues in the field.

 

 

METHOD OF CONTENT -- INTERNAL COMPARATIVE ANALYIS

I wrote out my observations in the form of a diary, flowing the model profile (Folsom, 1976). I transcribed them into the computer. I began to analyze this data with borrowed categories, such as art orientations from Michael (1970). As time progressed, I began to notice other emerging concepts or repetitive patterns in these cases. I started color coding them in the margins of my transcripts. I developed a color code key and defined the concepts. Then I reorganized my diary notes to be consistent with each case.

Later, I wrote each case individually and developed a comparison chart.

Note: A case can be a person, a class, a course, a culture. Concepts are abstract ideas; some are simple like the idea of redness and others are more complicated such as subtle cultural hatred. Some are scientifically known; some are popular; others exist as folk metaphors; some are hidden (tacit knowing).

Example Chart of Emerging & Borrowed Concepts of Portraits of Three Junior High Student Cases

  Chris Matt Tommy
Appearance proper jock hiphop
Behavior shy very social antisocial
Favorite Artist Van Gogh    
       
Art influences older sister coach art teacher
Art Orientation intellectual primitive intuitive with some intellectual
Project 1: Animal Drawing detailed stereotyped expressive-wild
Last Project: 3D Animal Mask owl small rigid helmut lion with mane with nose in the round dog, less detail unfinished more expression

Example Chart the Results of Content Analyses of Three Gentlemen's Cases:

  Mr. L Mr. T Mr. S
Disability      
Art Media Preferences loved architecture loves cartoons loves abstact paintings
Attitude towards art afraid to make mistable, uses eraser likes the story art is emotionalyl appealing
Response to Cassatt's work

needs a model sample

loved the subject-family loved the exaggerated body parts
Art Orientation Mechanical Schematic Intuitive
       
Still Life Result: arrangement arranged his work symmetrically; outlined forms with ruler arranged work in a row on table baseline, outlined only arranged work on the plane from aerial view. Added some shading and shadow; added emotional colors

(See Figure 1A&1B) (See Figure 2A &2B) (See Figure 3A & 3B)

From Folsom, S. (1976). The art educator in the preadolescent world: A phenomenological descriptive study of teacher and children. (Doctoral dissertation. Penn State University, 1976). DAI 37 (11A), p. 6903. (Microfilm No. 77-09765]

 

EXTERNAL COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

I compared the findings from my study with results from similar studies, such as Folsom (1976). . . . .

 

 

POSSIBLE LOCAL SITES for FINAL PROJECT

NATIVE AMERICAN SITES: CIBECUE APACHE, WHITE RIVER APACE; YAVAPI TRIBAL SCHOOL , DESERT EAGLE SECONDARY SCHOOL (MARICOPA/PIMA), YAQUI COMMUNITY SCHOOL

SUDANESE IMMIGRANTS

LOCAL COMMUNITY CENTERS: ARIZONA

MUSEUM FOR YOUTH (MESA)

COWBOY ARTISTS;

FAMILY ART MUSEUM [PHOENIX]

CULTURE SCHOOLS ON SATURDAY: CHINESE, POLISH SUBCULTURES:

ART CARS, BIKER CULTURE, Tattooing & Makeup Artists SKATE BOARD CULTURE ART FOR PHYSICALLY-CHALLENGED –

SHEMER CENTER (CAMBLEBACK): ART & PHYSICALY HANDICAPPED

RELEASE THE FEAR: ROBERT MILEY (602) 258-6107 (conflict resolution and healing power of education through art).

ART WITH THE ELDERLY: Quilt groups at Friendship Village-Mesa

HISPANIC COMMUNITY SITES: MERCADO MUSEUM AND UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS

ART IN PRISONS

JAPANESE MATZURI FESTIVAL: Tea Ceremony & Pottery, Calligraphy

SCHOOL FOR HOMELESS: Thomas Pappas School in Tempe & Phoenix;

VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE;

FREE ARTS OF ARIZONA